The Sun

This isn’t such a big issue in Ireland, but it still needs consideration. A vantage point which has the camera facing north will produce much clearer and better images than one facing south. The effect of this can be minimised by using cameras with a Wide Dynamic Range and by various colour settings, but it needs to be thought of in advance, just in case the sun does come out.

Privacy

Quite often you will find that your vantage point unavoidably overlooks someone else’s property. We’ve had cases where this might be a school playground or a private balcony. In both cases, it’s essential that you don’t capture private information that would be in breach of data protection. On most IP Cameras (including models used by Evercam) there is an option for a privacy filter which blanks out specified regions at source. This means that the private information is never captured in the first place, an essential requirement for compliance.

How high will the building be?

Duh. By seriously. Consider the vantage point’s suitability for the building throughout the lifecycle of the construction process. If you’re going to need to change the location during the build then it’s better to know that up front.

The Wind

This is particularly important when mounting onto a crane or a pole. Even if it may seem stable, small vibrations will disturb the quality of the time-lapse. In general, anything up to 2 -3 degrees can be compensated for in post production by various “anti-shake” filters which will align images that are roughly the same. If the shake is much more than that you will end up having a very cropped image.

Licences etc.

The list is long. CCTV installation in Ireland requires a PSA Licence. Drone photography requires a drone licence. Building sites will require at minimum a safe pass and most will require a method statement and possibly a site specific induction process. Fines can be imposed after the fact, so be sure that you’re covered.